Richard Rogers

Richard Rogers, 2015.
Fabriano Paper and graphite.
16cm x 19 cm

Richard Rogers

Richard Rogers

“There are three ways of communicating, one is by drawing or sketching; one is by models and one is by criticism.  Drawing is clearly the most direct”.  Richard Rogers

Born in Florence in 1933, Richard Rogers is an architect, urbanist and humanist.  Rogers trained at the Architectural Association in London (1954-9) and at Yale University (1961-2).

Rogers gained international recognition for the design, with Renzo Piano, of the Centre Pompidou, Paris (1971-7), which has become a landmark for the city.

His seminal buildings include the Lloyd’s of London (1978-86), the 02 Arena (1996-9) in London and an office tower on the World Trade Centre site (2010-) which is currently under construction.

Richard Rogers, 2014.
Fabriano Paper and graphite.
23.5cm x 35cm

Nicholas Grimshaw

Nicholas Grimshaw

“Drawing by hand has always been important to me as a way of describing a concept.  First I walk up and down for a long time forming a concept in my head.  Then, suddenly I am ready to get it down on paper – sometimes on only one sheet, usually using a ballpoint pen with a broad line”.  Nicholas Grimshaw

Nicholas Grimshaw is a British architect who was born in 1939.  After graduating from the Architectural Association in 1965, he started his own practice.

Grimshaw Architects’ approach to design comes from a detailed understanding of the functions the buildings must fulfil, the conditions they have to provide and the materials from which they are constructed.  His buildings are concerned with form, detail and materials.

The practice’s work includes the Eden Project in Cornwall (1996-2001), London’s Waterloo International railway station (1988-93), Lord’s Cricket Ground’s Grandstand (1995-8) in London.

Nicholas Grimshaw, 2014.
Fabriano Paper and graphite.
23.5cm x 35cm

Ron Arad

Ron Arad

“I always drew things, since I was a boy.  My mother was a painter, but every time I did a drawing, she’d say, ‘Be an architect’, to make sure I didn’t start wanting to become an artist.  My pencil was always my tool.  A lifetime later, it’s still all about the pencil in the hand”.  Ron Arad

Tel Aviv-born Arad is known for the versatility of his design work ranging from products to buildings.

Famous for the Rover chair (1981) and buildings including the Belgo restaurants in London and the Design Museum Holon in Israel (2006-10), Ron Arad co-founded the architecture and design firm, Ron Arad Associates in 1989 and Ron Arad Architects in 2008 and his offices are based in London.

Ron Arad, 2014.
Fabriano Paper and graphite.
23.5cm x 35cm

Norman Foster

Norman Foster

“Architecture is as much about the fine print as the headlines – the tactile details, which are literally close enough to touch. Sketching, for me, is a vital way of exploring these concerns”.  Norman Foster

British architect, Norman Foster studied architecture at Manchester University (1956-60) and gained a Master’s Degree in Architecture at Yale University (1961-2). Foster is the founder of Foster + Partners.

He famously made sketches of his proposed scheme for the Sainsbury Centre in the UK in front of the selection committee.  The Mayor of Norwich said Foster understood the city in two pencil strokes. Foster won the commission.

Other designs include the redevelopment of the Reichstag in Berlin (1992-99), the Swiss Re office building in London (1997-04) and has recently completed the Edward P Evans Hall, Yale School of Management, Yale University (2007-14).

Norman Foster, 2014.
Fabriano Paper and graphite.
23.5cm x 35cm

Andrew Morris

Andrew Morris, 2015.
Fabriano Paper and graphite.
16cm x 19 cm

Mr Turkish

Mr Turkish, 2012
Fabriano Paper and graphite.
10cm x 14 cm

Mr. Hiscock

Mr Hiscock, 2012
Fabriano Paper and graphite.
10.5cm x 15.5 cm